Comforting your sick, lazy self + Twitter

What a fancy seeing me here! I’ve kept quiet for almost the entirety of July, I am well aware. Blogging sat in the back of mind for a couple of weeks, and then it invaded my conscience and found a voice. It said things like, “Post!” and “Review!” and I said, “No.” After leaving one of the more stressful school years behind this spring, I felt I deserved a break. I was done. Kaput. Out of energy. I wanted a vacation from cramped schedules and due dates and ARC reading. Well, I cannot do anything about the books I’ve received for review, but I did–clearly–go away for a short while. It wasn’t all fun: I first came down with a two-week bug followed by a bout of laziness, or you might say my two-week bug was laziness followed by more laziness.

medical conditional called laziness

During this great period of Doing Nothing, I read a bit of this book and that book, watched a show here and there… Which made me think: I love comfort books. But not only that. I also love TV shows and movies for comfort, especially ones I can watch on repeat a hundred times. In every sense of the word, I am a book nerd, though I’d be lying if I said I don’t love sitting in front of the screen for hours just a bit more than reading.

comfort reading

If I feel flu-ish or like a couch potato, I become drawn to certain books that meet certain criteria. When sick, there is no chance I’ll seek a book weighted in politics, intricate plots, and complex storylines. All of these qualities, when brought to life by good writing, can make an excellent piece of literature, but who wants that with a fogged brain? I demand light and simple yet interesting. I don’t want a book whose plot flies ten feet above my ability to grasp it, but I don’t want a book that puts me to sleep either. To name some personal favorites, I compiled a few lists…

1. I love a book that can wow me. A book that’s unique, emotionally compelling, and intelligent. My reading, however, should never be restricted to “smart” or “impressive” novels–reading should be fun, and that entails rehashed plots or predictability equally as much as it entails originality. So long as the reader enjoys the book, who cares?  Straight-forward books that offer non-complex world-building often become some of my favorite comfort material, and here are only a select number of preferred light reading:

anna

*Anna & The French Kiss and I didn’t get off on good footing the first time around, but now–well, yes. I understand the book’s appeal. I understood it the first time I read it, but that understanding is now on par with zealous fans. I’m not a zealous fan–just to be clear–but I like this novel for how simple and light it proves to be. It’s predictable with the perfect about of fluff and drama, and once you accept Anna & the French Kiss for it is, you just might like it, too

2. One word: manga!

Ladies & Gentlemen: Mikasa Ackerman of Shingeki no Kyojin & why she's top BAMF. You are welcome.

Ladies & Gentlemen: Mikasa Ackerman of Shingeki no Kyojin & why she’s top BAMF. You are welcome.

I stand before you at the cusp of entering a manga obsession. I’ve never been a manga person, as I can count on one hand the number of manga I’ve read before this week (two). Having finished EVERYTHING that is currently available of Shingeki no Kyojin (SNK/Attack on Titan), I died. Then, upon realizing that SNK is not the only manga out there, I undied and began my search. I’m brand new at this–a beginner. I can’t provide a decent recommendation list, but I will say that–just like any novel–manga storylines are either complex or simple.  Not all are mind-blowing or likable, but the added bonus of a good manga artist and writer (not to forget: a good translator) make even the sophisticated plots fairly comprehensible. I appreciate this.

e7: blue mondaySo on that note:

*The Eureka 7 manga is an adaption of the original anime show of the same name. Between the two, I highly recommend the anime.

3. Those books I will re-read and re-read and… re-read…

When it comes to reading, my biggest problem is allowing myself to get swept up in one book only to be distracted by three more. I don’t accomplish too many re-reads for this reason, but the aforementioned titles are books I will re-read in an instant. They remain as some of my personal favorites, and I give high praise to each. Whenever I’m down with a cold, this is a handful of what I reach for on my shelf.

Fact: Something Strange & Deadly is my favorite comfort book to re-read. At four read-throughs, it’s my second-most read book (only topped by A Monster Calls by Patrick Ness).

film preview

Maybe it’s because I’m a nostalgic person–or perhaps it’s because I loved my mother’s pampering when I was little–but when I’m sick or avoiding chores, I seek things which define my childhood: Spice Girls, Harry Potter, Disney, and well…

1. “Family-fun movies”

2. Shows that know a good time…

Unless you’re my grandmother who solely lives for Lifetime movies, there is a high chance you will enjoy these shows. I will watch every single episode back-to-back–recycle and repeat; no rinse.

*Now, bumping into people who refuse to watch ATLA is almost as frustrating as discovering people who deny watching it. If you think you’re too old for ATLA and LOK, if you think you’re too old for anything animated, then get out of my face or prepare to be agni kai’d off this planet. I will burn you into ashes of shame and humiliation from which you will never rise. Insulting these shows is outrageous. It’s blasphemous. You don’t stomp over a sacred creation without consequence. Thank and bless Michael Dimartino and Bryan Konietzko, amen.

atla water tribe

Speaking of, Korra’s second season is coming this September! Who else feels excited?

3. Re-visiting a few more childhood favorites…

I am sorry? You don’t like Pokémon or Sailor Moon? We cannot be friends.

twitterYes, I am now on Twitter. Maybe? I am here! But, uh, not tweeting. I am intelligent enough to create a Twitter account, but I am not intelligent enough to tweet. Standby as I finish Twitter for Dummies. In the meantime, drop me a comment, because feed is superbly boring when there’s no one to spam it.

Tell me: What are your favorite shows and books to revisit?

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Top Ten Tuesday #11

Top Ten Tuesday is an original weekly meme hosted by The Broke and the Bookish. Click here to read more and join!

Top Ten Tuesday is an original weekly meme hosted by The Broke and the Bookish. Click here to read more and join!

This Top Ten Tuesday prompt is a fun one, I think: favorite covers of books I’ve read*, also known as covergasms. It’s preferable if a story proves as wondrous as its cover art, but even if I loathe a book, you can find me drooling over its eye-candy front. Here are a mere ten books (with extra notable mentions) whose fancy covers caught my eye:

Can a person ever go wrong when it comes to a Barnes & Noble cover? I love their paperbacks, even. My Grimms’ Fairy Tales copy is part of B&N’s leatherbound collection, gifted by an old friend, and I’ve never stopped adoring the cover. My one complaint is that the page edges are frosted in a sparkling gold, which–as I learned the sad way–easily brushes off.

The cover to Connolly’s The Book of Lost Things, although without golden pages, reminds me of a few B&N hardbacks: it’s simple but elegant-looking. Seraphina is all-around love, however, as I equally adore Hartman’s writing as I do the cover. The sepia provides a medieval appearance with a flavor of fantastic (dragons!). It does have a few rusty smudges, which is part of the artwork — though I have a terrible urge to wipe them off!

Mr. Fox

4. Mr. Fox by Helen Oyeyemi

I read the edition on the left-hand side, although I fancy both covers. The cover on the right is very Old Hollywood-esque, by my favorite, however, is from the copy I read. I remember spotting it in the library and deciding to grab it on whim after reading the jacket blurb. Although Oyeyemi presents a rather confusing storyline, I enjoyed each tale, which I think the cover represents well.

books 5 - 6 TTT

5. Dr. Bird’s Advice for Sad Poets by Evan Roskos
6. How to Say Goodbye in Robot by Natalie Standiford

These two books are triple-threats: simple cover designs that scream awesome, quirky titles, and great writing. While I’m attracted to the covers to both of these books, it’s the titles that I gravitated toward. The titles are entirely their own, possessing a unique quality shared by the stories that are bound between the covers. I don’t have the words for the cover of How to Say Goodbye in Robot other than “covergasmic love” and “I’m sure more boys would read this if the cover wasn’t pink!” Rosko’s cover, on the other hand, feels fresh. Considering that I find the story quite different from others like it, I think the cover suits the story.

The Rabbits

7. The Rabbits by John Marsden & Shaun Tan

I am a huge fan of Shaun Tan’s art in general, but The Rabbits–among a couple of other Shaun Tan books–is what I consider one of his best works. As art and text combine to communicate a powerful message, The Rabbits tells an allegoric tale about colonization. The cover does a wonderful job in revealing the story’s tense atmosphere, and–of course–it’s another showcase of Shaun Tan’s genius.

Jelly Roll

8. Jelly Roll: A Blues by Kevin Young

Jelly Roll: A Blues has remained near the top of my “books with awesome covers” list since I first discovered it in 2011. The faded wash and phonograph offer a subtle quiet, but there is also a jaunty, fun-hearted feeling that jumps at the reader. It’s a modernized old soul, very “blues-y,” equipped with inventive language that knows how to lament and praise. With a complementary color scheme to boot, I don’t think you can ask for a better cover.

books 9 - 10 TTT

9. The End of the Alphabet by C.S. Richardson
10. The Merchant & the Alchemist’s Gate by Ted Chiang

The End of the Alphabet and The Merchant & the Alchemist’s Gate both have a Saharan or Middle Eastern feel to their covers, which initially attracted me. Covers that flaunt their fancy designs without superfluous detail will always win my adoration, but I appreciate artwork that feels more simple yet has a mighty voice. The End of the Alphabet is eye-pleasing, although the story didn’t take me where I had hoped it would based on the cover. Chiang’s novella, however, brought me everywhere I’d hoped and then some — something that I feel the cover does well in preparing prospective readers for.

>>Notable Mentions:

TTT nb 1

TTT nb 2

*My list would be endless if I could include books sitting on my TBR list!

What are some of your favorite book covers? Comment below or link me to your TTT post — I’d love to know!

Top Ten Tuesday #9

Top Ten Tuesday is an original weekly meme hosted by The Broke and the Bookish. Click here to read more and join!

Top Ten Tuesday is an original weekly meme hosted by The Broke and the Bookish. Click here to read more and join!

Guess what this week’s Top Ten Tuesday’s prompt is all about? My favorite thing: book recommendations! And here are ten I suggest the most:

Between Shades of Gray How to Say Goodbye in Robot SeraphinaIt's Kind of a  Funny Story Looking for Alaska The Arrival The Book Thief 2 The Perks of Being a Wallflower

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1. Between Shades of Gray by Ruta Sepetys
Sadly, I’m always too wrapped up in other books to read Ruta Sepetys’ debut novel a second time. At some point, which I hope is this year, I would love to re-read and even review it. Ruta is one talented writer who, despite the stark atmosphere of this novel, manages to sprout hope between the pages. With writing so swift and striking, it’s no wonder that I recommend this book so often. It’s not that Between Shades of Gray is only well-written and tactful–and with a great protagonist to top it off–but the novel sheds light on a piece of history that’s been hidden in the shadows. Whether you have or have not read this book, I also highly recommend that anyone watch the ‘promotional trailer’ of sorts here.

2. How to Say Goodbye in Robot by Natalie Standiford
Another book I recommend often is Natalie Standiford’s How To Say Goodbye in Robot. As far as young adult contemporary/realistic fiction goes, I have yet to encounter any similar book and I don’t think I ever will. Standiford’s novel stands alone, which–regardless of its flaws–is great. I discuss a little of the book in this post, but I of course prefer that you check out the book instead — and read it!

3. Seraphina (Seraphina #1) by Rachel Hartman
I was crazy about Seraphina before it was published, and now I’m all sorts of crazy amplified by ten just waiting on the sequel. Although I’ve been successful in persuading others to read Hartman’s glamorousandkick-ass novel, I don’t think any amount of converts will please me because I just need to talk about this book ALL THE TIME. Hands down, I adore Seraphina as a character — she is an intensely smart, observant individual who is not simply relatable, but beautiful inside and out. My review can be read here, but I also mention Seraphina in this post as well.

4. It’s Kind of a Funny Story by Ned Vizzini
First, I desperately plead, do not judge this book by its movie. The two are quite different in my opinion, and in all places where the movie flounders the book prevails. Out of many young adult novels I’ve read that deal with mental health, I feel that Vizzini nails it. Craig embodies the emotions of those who live with and have experienced depression, and what I admire most of all is how Vizzini works in humor. Yes: this is a novel about depression that is not depressing. Who’d have thought? Instead, the book is an uplifting story as it follows a boy’s one-week stay in a mental hospital after choosing not to kill himself.

5. Looking for Alaska by John Green
I may never love another John Green novel as much as I love Looking for Alaska, because I’m still waiting for its equal. This book, alongside one other, is what hooked me into exploring young adult literature. Miles “Pudge” Halter is a rather sentimental guy, quite thoughtful, and he undergoes a memorable coming-of-age experience. Off at boarding school, he finds his place among life-long friends and in a sad turn of events, loses one. This novel is sincere but balanced well by John Green’s trademark wit, and I have the feeling that Looking for Alaska will have a special place on my shelf for years to come.

6. The Arrival by Shaun Tan
Shaun Tan’s work in The Arrival stunned me speechless. However wordless (that goes for the book and myself), Tan shows the wonder in his artistic ability through cinematic-like images. The story follows a man as he journeys away from his homeland only to arrive in a foreign world, filled with odd devices and customs, and even odder creatures. It’s an old tale to tell: the story of an immigrant, and what sets The Arrival apart is how Shaun Tan breathes life into it with impressive images. A lot of work–you might not think–went into creating this book, which you can read about (and view pages from the book!) by clicking here.

7. The Book Thief by Markus Zusak
Maybe some day I will get the knots out of my tongue to properly review this page-turner. Until then, I will slap it across the head of anyone willing to listen. You might think a smack from a 550-page book would hurt, but that is nothing in comparison to what its words and characters do to your heart. Death, as a narrator, does a spectacular job — even when he spoils the ending way ahead of time — because he’s much more human than he likes to think, and I swear there’s a heart and soul trapped in the pages.

8. The Perks of Being a Wallflower by Stephen Chbosky
This is one of those book that, if I catch you insulting it, I will smack you silly across the face. …In my head. I won’t really abuse your face til it’s red and raw, but I’m rather attached –unfortunately?–and I will judge. There are people who easily dismiss Chbosky’s book because of its lasting popularity, and I’m happy to say that I picked this up on whim. I had no previous knowledge of this book, but a friend listed it as one of her favorite reads. Trusting her taste, I gave it a go as well and fell in love.

There Are No Children Here A Monster Calls

9. There Are No Children Here by Alex Kotlowitz
There Are No Children Here was required reading for my sociology class, and reading it had me deeply interested in the lives of these two boys. Far from simply informative, it’s heart-wrenching and mind-opening — even more so because it isn’t fiction. This is the true story, as told by Alex Kotlowitz, of Lafeyette and Pharoah growing up in “the other America.”

10. A Monster Calls written by Patrick Ness, inspired by Siobhan Dowd, and illustrated by Jim Kay
I can’t recommend this book enough. It’s honest and keenly written with certain awareness. From the moment I started reading I could see no happy ending, which–to be honest–was not what I’d expected. Unaware of the story, I believed a spooky tale lie ready for reading, and how completely wrong I was. It is unusual for me to like a book, and more to love a book, when initial expectations are struck down, and it’s not often that literature brings real tears dripping down my face.

Which books do you recommend most often?

Recommend a… (book you read this year!)

Recommend A… is a weekly meme run by Chick Loves Lit. Click here to check out future prompts and take part!

How to Say Goodbye in Robot by Natalie Standiford
Published October 1st, 2009 | Scholastic Press
Young Adult Realistic Fiction

From bestselling author Natalie Standiford, an amazing, touching story of two friends navigating the dark waters of their senior year.

New to town, Beatrice is expecting her new best friend to be one of the girls she meets on the first day. But instead, the alphabet conspires to seat her next to Jonah, aka Ghost Boy, a quiet loner who hasn’t made a new friend since third grade. Something about him, though, gets to Bea, and soon they form an unexpected friendship. It’s not romance, exactly – but it’s definitely love. Still, Bea can’t quite dispel Jonah’s gloom and doom – and as she finds out his family history, she understands why. Can Bea help Jonah? Or is he destined to vanish?

Given the choice to suggest one out of the eighty-six I’ve read this year (I’m on a roll, kind of…), I choose How to Say Goodbye in Robot. I could (and do) recommend The Hunger Games, I Sang to the Monster, The Book Thief, Between Shades of Gray (no fifty, and much more YA-appropriate)… The list goes on. However, Standiford’s book stands out among other YA contemporaries I’ve read, and I’m sad that I have no one to share it with.

A fair percentage of readers don’t understand the relationship between Bea and Jonah — the two become so intrinsically bound that their connection transcends mere friendship, and yet absolutely nothing romantic results from it. Frankly, I adore that. These two characters manifest an unconditional love for one another, developing an attachment that will last a lifetime. Trying to label the relationship, I find,  proves ineffectual; words can’t name it. (To discuss it, though…) One can say they sit somewhere between best friends and a couple, but — and I believe Jonah himself says something similar — they have something that tops both, and I enjoyed watching their friendship thrive and mature. While this book has imperfections, I found it overall heart-warming, funny, and bittersweet — it is a book I think about often and would love to re-read.

(Poor-quality picture-excerpt does not apologize.) See my How to Say Goodbye in Robot favorite quotes & excerpts.