Top Ten Tuesday #11

Top Ten Tuesday is an original weekly meme hosted by The Broke and the Bookish. Click here to read more and join!

Top Ten Tuesday is an original weekly meme hosted by The Broke and the Bookish. Click here to read more and join!

This Top Ten Tuesday prompt is a fun one, I think: favorite covers of books I’ve read*, also known as covergasms. It’s preferable if a story proves as wondrous as its cover art, but even if I loathe a book, you can find me drooling over its eye-candy front. Here are a mere ten books (with extra notable mentions) whose fancy covers caught my eye:

Can a person ever go wrong when it comes to a Barnes & Noble cover? I love their paperbacks, even. My Grimms’ Fairy Tales copy is part of B&N’s leatherbound collection, gifted by an old friend, and I’ve never stopped adoring the cover. My one complaint is that the page edges are frosted in a sparkling gold, which–as I learned the sad way–easily brushes off.

The cover to Connolly’s The Book of Lost Things, although without golden pages, reminds me of a few B&N hardbacks: it’s simple but elegant-looking. Seraphina is all-around love, however, as I equally adore Hartman’s writing as I do the cover. The sepia provides a medieval appearance with a flavor of fantastic (dragons!). It does have a few rusty smudges, which is part of the artwork — though I have a terrible urge to wipe them off!

Mr. Fox

4. Mr. Fox by Helen Oyeyemi

I read the edition on the left-hand side, although I fancy both covers. The cover on the right is very Old Hollywood-esque, by my favorite, however, is from the copy I read. I remember spotting it in the library and deciding to grab it on whim after reading the jacket blurb. Although Oyeyemi presents a rather confusing storyline, I enjoyed each tale, which I think the cover represents well.

books 5 - 6 TTT

5. Dr. Bird’s Advice for Sad Poets by Evan Roskos
6. How to Say Goodbye in Robot by Natalie Standiford

These two books are triple-threats: simple cover designs that scream awesome, quirky titles, and great writing. While I’m attracted to the covers to both of these books, it’s the titles that I gravitated toward. The titles are entirely their own, possessing a unique quality shared by the stories that are bound between the covers. I don’t have the words for the cover of How to Say Goodbye in Robot other than “covergasmic love” and “I’m sure more boys would read this if the cover wasn’t pink!” Rosko’s cover, on the other hand, feels fresh. Considering that I find the story quite different from others like it, I think the cover suits the story.

The Rabbits

7. The Rabbits by John Marsden & Shaun Tan

I am a huge fan of Shaun Tan’s art in general, but The Rabbits–among a couple of other Shaun Tan books–is what I consider one of his best works. As art and text combine to communicate a powerful message, The Rabbits tells an allegoric tale about colonization. The cover does a wonderful job in revealing the story’s tense atmosphere, and–of course–it’s another showcase of Shaun Tan’s genius.

Jelly Roll

8. Jelly Roll: A Blues by Kevin Young

Jelly Roll: A Blues has remained near the top of my “books with awesome covers” list since I first discovered it in 2011. The faded wash and phonograph offer a subtle quiet, but there is also a jaunty, fun-hearted feeling that jumps at the reader. It’s a modernized old soul, very “blues-y,” equipped with inventive language that knows how to lament and praise. With a complementary color scheme to boot, I don’t think you can ask for a better cover.

books 9 - 10 TTT

9. The End of the Alphabet by C.S. Richardson
10. The Merchant & the Alchemist’s Gate by Ted Chiang

The End of the Alphabet and The Merchant & the Alchemist’s Gate both have a Saharan or Middle Eastern feel to their covers, which initially attracted me. Covers that flaunt their fancy designs without superfluous detail will always win my adoration, but I appreciate artwork that feels more simple yet has a mighty voice. The End of the Alphabet is eye-pleasing, although the story didn’t take me where I had hoped it would based on the cover. Chiang’s novella, however, brought me everywhere I’d hoped and then some — something that I feel the cover does well in preparing prospective readers for.

>>Notable Mentions:

TTT nb 1

TTT nb 2

*My list would be endless if I could include books sitting on my TBR list!

What are some of your favorite book covers? Comment below or link me to your TTT post — I’d love to know!

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